This post is the part II of our last blog post “4 Secrets to Building Your Best Brand (Part I).”

In addition to start using your trademark as early as possible to obtain important trademark rights and start selling goods or services across state lines with your trademark to allow it to be regulated by the Trademark Act, here are two more secrets to help you build your best brand!

  • DON’T INFRINGE ON OTHERS’ MARKS

Trademark Infringement means a violation of the exclusive rights attached to a trademark without the authorization of the trademark owner or any licensees.

For example, situations like these:

When evaluating whether two trademarks are confusingly similar, courts in the U.S. actually look at between nine to thirteen different factors to determine whether there is confusion that will cause trademark infringement. So when lawyers create trademark search reports, we look at those different elements and provide an analysis to prevent our clients from infringing others’ marks.

The two most important factors of this analysis are the following:

  • The similarity or dissimilarity of the marks in their entireties as to appearance, sound, connotation, and commercial impression.
  • The relatedness of the goods or services.

The greater the similarity between marks, the less related the goods or services have to be in order to support a finding of likelihood of confusion. Therefore, if two marks are identical or virtually identical, the respective goods or services need not be as close to finding a likelihood of confusion.

 Other factors of this analysis include: 

  • The similarity of established, likely-to-continue trade channels.
  • The conditions under which and buyers to whom sales are made, i.e., “impulse” vs. careful, sophisticated purchasing
  • The number and nature of similar marks in use on similar goods 
  • The existence of a valid consent agreement between the applicant and the owner of the previously registered mark  
  • The fame of the prior mark
  • Nature and extent of any actual confusion
  • Concurrent use without evidence of actual confusion: length of time and conditions

Before you apply to register your trademark with the USPTO, you should search the USPTO’s trademark database – Trademark Electronic Search System (TESS) to see if any trademark has already been registered or applied for that is: similar to your trademark, used on related products or for related services, and live.

  • BE THE OWNER OF YOUR MARK

Copyrights are generally owned by the person who created the works of expression. Therefore, if you are not the creator of your trademark you may not be the actual owner of the mark!

If you are not the actual creator of a creative work, then the only way that you can acquire exclusive rights to the work is by having a signed and legally sufficient writing transferring some or all of those rights exclusively to you or your business. If the creative work is created by an employee in the course of his or her employment, the employer owns the copyright. If it is your independent contractor that created the work, then it depends on whether the independent contractor signed a written agreement stating that the work shall be “made for hire,” or enter into an assignment agreement with you.

It is important to note that, under California law, including a work made for hire clause in an independent contractor agreement with an individual will cause the California-based independent contractor to be considered a “statutory employee” under California’s workers’ compensation, unemployment insurance, and disability insurance laws.

Therefore, when you are creating your trademark, make sure you are the exclusive owner of your mark/logo when you hire an independent contractor to create it, by using work for hire agreement or a copyright assignment agreement and don’t forget to address potential worker classification issues!

If you need help with registering a new trademark with the USPTO, contact us today to discuss your trademark protection strategies with an experienced trademark attorney. Schedule an appointment with us to have a free initial consultation. 

We are located in.

Carbon Law Group, APLC

1001 Wilshire Blvd. Suite 100 #3200

Los Angeles, CA 90017

Carbon Law Group, P.C.

840 Apollo Street, Suite 100,

El Segundo, CA 90245

Carbon Law Group, P.C.

2500 Broadway Building F, Suite F-125,

Santa Monica, CA 90404

Carbon Law Group, P.C.

4195 Chino Hills Parkway #1135

Chino Hills CA 91709

(323) 543-4453

IMPRINT

Carbon Law Group PC| Attorneys of Law | 1001 Wilshire Boulevard PMB 2083

Phone: (323) 543-4453 | Fax: (323) 488-9784 | Email:[email protected]

Located in Los Angeles, California, the law firm of Carbon Law Group PC. represents clients throughout California, including, but not limited to the cities of Los Angeles, El Segundo, Torrance, Pasadena, Santa Monica, Culver City, Long Beach, Irvine, Costa Mesa, and Orange County, Los Angeles County, Riverside County, San Bernardino County and San Diego County.

DISCLAIMER

No Attorney-Client Relationship Created by Use of this Website. Neither your receipt of information from this website nor your use of this website to contact the Carbon Law Group, P.C. (hereinafter “the Firm”) or one of its lawyers creates an attorney-client relationship between you and the Firm. You will become a client of the Firm only if and when you sign an engagement agreement setting forth the scope of the Firm’s engagement, the fee arrangement, and other relevant matters. As a matter of policy, the Firm does not accept a new client without first investigating for possible conflicts of interests and obtaining a signed engagement letter. (The Firm may, for example, already represent another party involved in your matter.)

No Confidentiality. You may not use this website to provide confidential information about a legal matter of yours to the Firm. Your use of this website does not make you a client of the firm or even a prospective client of the Firm. If you have confidential information that you would like to give to any lawyer at the Firm, please communicate with one of the Firm’s lawyers in person or by telephone–not by filling in any form on this website or by sending an unsolicited email to the Firm or any of its lawyers.

No Legal Advice Intended. This website includes general information about legal issues and developments in the law. Such materials are for informational purposes only and may not reflect the most current legal developments. These informational materials are not intended, and must not be taken, as legal advice on any particular set of facts or circumstances. You need to contact a lawyer licensed in your jurisdiction for advice on specific legal issues problems..

Call Now Button Skip to content